Mark Von Hagen

Ukraine between East and West: Linking the Past to the Present

Dr. Mark Von Hagen, Arizona State University
May 31, 2015 (Sun) 3:00 – 5:00 p.m
UNM Continuing Education Conference Center

Events in Ukraine are swirling so rapidly that by May the situation in that troubled country is likely to have changed dramatically.  But we can be sure of one thing: Mark Von Hagen will provide us with a much needed explanation of Ukrainian history and its impact on the current crisis.  He will give us a much deeper understanding of the problems of state and nation building in the country by putting it in historical perspective.  He will also inform us about Ukraine’s international situation, her relations with Russia, Poland, the US and the EU, and address the important question: Where does Ukraine fit in the broader picture of European socio-economic and political developments?

There is no one in the country better able to explain Ukraine in terms of its current problems, as well as in terms of its troubled history than Mark Von Hagen. Von Hagen was educated at Georgetown University, Indiana University-Bloomington, and Stanford University, where he received his Ph.D. He has taught at Stanford University, Yale University, Columbia University, the Free University of Berlin, and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris). He served as Associate Director and then Director of the Harriman Institute (1989–2001). Mark von Hagen now teaches Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian history at Arizona State University. He is the author of Soldiers in the Proletarian Dictatorship: The Red Army and the Soviet Socialist State, 1917-1930 (Cornell, 1990); co-editor (with Andreas Kappeler, Zenon Kohut and Frank Sysyn) of Culture, Nation, Identity: the Ukrainian-Russian Encounter, 1600-1945 (Toronto, 2003); as well as many other books. From 2002 to 2005 Von Hagen was president of the International Association for Ukrainian Studies. In 2008 von Hagen was elected President of the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

Supported by New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia National Labs and Haverland Carter Lifestyle Group